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Waking Up on the Right Side of the Bed

Waking Up on the Right Side of the Bed

When thinking about sleep, it’s easy to imagine your brain simply shuts off for 8 hours and then reboots to your alarm in the morning. But sleep is not just one solid state of unconsciousness. Sleep is broken up into 5 stages, each one lasting for 5 to 15 minutes each. Each stage is pivotal for both biological and psychological health. When we get sleep deprived or have disruptions in our sleep, our body is unable to cycle through all those stages and we suffer because of it. When we let our bodies rest and heal in the ways they need to, we benefit both physically and mentally.

Shortchanging Sleep

It’s time to get to the bottom of the short sleeper myth. As far back as Albert Einstein, there have been a handful of successful people that attribute part of their success to their ability to consistently sleep less than 6 hours every night. The Center for Creative Leadership ran a study and saw that 42% of leaders get less than 6 hours of sleep a night. However, recent research shows that less than 5% of people are naturally short sleepers, people who have a genetic mutation that makes them less susceptible to the effects of sleep deprivation. So how are the 42% doing it and what happens when you are a short sleeper without the genetic mutation?

Waking Up on the Right Side of the Bed

When thinking about sleep, it’s easy to imagine your brain simply shuts off for 8 hours and then reboots to your alarm in the morning. But sleep is not just one solid state of unconsciousness. Sleep is broken up into 5 stages, each one lasting for 5 to 15 minutes each. Each stage is pivotal for both biological and psychological health. When we get sleep deprived or have disruptions in our sleep, our body is unable to cycle through all those stages and we suffer because of it. When we let our bodies rest and heal in the ways they need to, we benefit both physically and mentally.

Shortchanging Sleep

It’s time to get to the bottom of the short sleeper myth. As far back as Albert Einstein, there have been a handful of successful people that attribute part of their success to their ability to consistently sleep less than 6 hours every night. The Center for Creative Leadership ran a study and saw that 42% of leaders get less than 6 hours of sleep a night. However, recent research shows that less than 5% of people are naturally short sleepers, people who have a genetic mutation that makes them less susceptible to the effects of sleep deprivation. So how are the 42% doing it and what happens when you are a short sleeper without the genetic mutation?

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